Morgenthau & Grayson

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Courtesy of the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library

After returning from the Paris Peace Conference, Woodrow Wilson was determined to see the United States join the League of Nations. Still, many in Congress were unsure of whether entry into the League of Nations would be good for the Unites States. Thus, Wilson began a public speaking tour of the country in order to convince the American people of his plan.  He suffered a collapse in Pueblo, Colorado and was forced to return to Washington D.C. after only completing part of his speaking tour. Shortly after returning to the White House, he had a stroke that debilitated him for the remainder of his life. Continue reading

Woodrow Wilson: An Intimate Memoir

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Dr. Grayson with Woodrow Wilson during the voyage to the Paris Peace Conference after World War 1.

Cary T. Grayson, known as Woodrow Wilson’s personal physician throughout his time in the White House, was by Wilson’s side throughout many important events such as the death of Ellen Wilson. He is also the person who introduced the president to Edith Bolling Galt, who would later become Wilson’s second wife. Continue reading

Liberty Loan Posters

When the United States entered World War I formally in 1917, the government recognized the need to raise money for the war effort. Already about $3,500,000,000 in debt to foreign creditors, the nation would need a significant amount of capital to loan funds and equipment to the Allies, as well as to supply and send troops overseas. To motivate Americans to loan money to the government, William Gibbs McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury and Woodrow Wilson’s son-in-law, created the Liberty Loan Bonds in 1917. Over the course of the war, the government issued four series of these war bonds. Five months after Armistice, the Treasury authorized a fifth and final series, the Victory Liberty Loan, on April 21, 1919. According to one pamphlet from the time, the money raised from this series would bring soldiers home from overseas, assist wounded veterans, and pay for wartime munitions.

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Sheepish Business: World War One and Sheep on the White House Lawn

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A flock of sheep grazed on the White House lawn for several years, beginning in the spring of 1918. With the American entry into World War I, the sheep saved manpower by keeping the grass trimmed, but their most valuable contribution to the country’s war effort was their wool.

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New Collections Blog at WWPL

As the world’s only museum dedicated to showcasing Woodrow Wilson’s life and career, we at the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library are pleased to welcome over 20,000 visitors each year to view our museum and tour the home where our 28th President was born in 1856. However, only a small fraction of our collection is currently on display.  Continue reading