Feuer Books

The library has a room full of shelves containing 0750936398.01._SX142_SY224_SCLZZZZZZZ_history books and texts from the early twentieth century, including those written by Woodrow Wilson, for researchers to use while working here. Now scholars can get an idea of what printed resources are on hand in our library before making the trip to Staunton by browsing through the research library collection at our website. Continue reading

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The Oddest Remedies

When Woodrow Wilson had a serious stroke in early October 1919, the public was told only that he was suffering from “nervous exhaustion” following a grueling speaking tour throughout the western U.S. to sway opinion in favor of the League of Nations. Cary Grayson, Wilson’s physician and friend was inundated with suggestions from other doctors and members of the general public who held President Wilson in high esteem and wanted to help him recover. Continue reading

Morgenthau & Grayson

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Courtesy of the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library

After returning from the Paris Peace Conference, Woodrow Wilson was determined to see the United States join the League of Nations. Still, many in Congress were unsure of whether entry into the League of Nations would be good for the Unites States. Thus, Wilson began a public speaking tour of the country in order to convince the American people of his plan.  He suffered a collapse in Pueblo, Colorado and was forced to return to Washington D.C. after only completing part of his speaking tour. Shortly after returning to the White House, he had a stroke that debilitated him for the remainder of his life. Continue reading

A Death and Burial Abroad

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Courtesy of the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library

Margaret Wilson, the oldest daughter of Woodrow Wilson spent the final years of her life as a part of the Hindu mystic Sri Aurobindo’s ashram in the Pondicherry, French India. She died there on February 12, 1944 from a uremia, and her family was notified by a letter that is now housed in the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library’s archival collection. Continue reading