Morgenthau & Grayson

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Courtesy of the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library

After returning from the Paris Peace Conference, Woodrow Wilson was determined to see the United States join the League of Nations. Still, many in Congress were unsure of whether entry into the League of Nations would be good for the Unites States. Thus, Wilson began a public speaking tour of the country in order to convince the American people of his plan.  He suffered a collapse in Pueblo, Colorado and was forced to return to Washington D.C. after only completing part of his speaking tour. Shortly after returning to the White House, he had a stroke that debilitated him for the remainder of his life. Continue reading

A Death and Burial Abroad

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Courtesy of the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library

Margaret Wilson, the oldest daughter of Woodrow Wilson spent the final years of her life as a part of the Hindu mystic Sri Aurobindo’s ashram in the Pondicherry, French India. She died there on February 12, 1944 from a uremia, and her family was notified by a letter that is now housed in the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library’s archival collection. Continue reading

Margaret Wilson: A Spiritual Journey

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Margaret Wilson. Courtesy of the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library

While many know that Woodrow Wilson had three daughters and his oldest daughter, Margaret Wilson served as First Lady after the death of her mother, Ellen Wilson in 1914, few know that Margaret lived and died in India after her father’s death. Going from her Presbyterian roots, to practicing Christian Science, and then later becoming a devotee of the guru Sri Aurobindo, Margaret’s life was a spiritual journey. Continue reading