Sailing to Paris

Edith and Woodrow Wilson sailed to Europe soon after the war ended with great fanfare at home and even more celebration when they got to France.

Edith wrote in a letter from the ship that the docks were lined with men and women at attention to send them off. Every effort was made to keep the president comfortable as he sailed off to take part in the peace negotiations, including carrier pigeons on board to bring last-minute messages back to New York.

The Oddest Remedies

When Woodrow Wilson had a serious stroke in early October 1919, the public was told only that he was suffering from “nervous exhaustion” following a grueling speaking tour throughout the western U.S. to sway opinion in favor of the League of Nations. Cary Grayson, Wilson’s physician and friend was inundated with suggestions from other doctors and members of the general public who held President Wilson in high esteem and wanted to help him recover. Continue reading

Morgenthau & Grayson

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Courtesy of the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library

After returning from the Paris Peace Conference, Woodrow Wilson was determined to see the United States join the League of Nations. Still, many in Congress were unsure of whether entry into the League of Nations would be good for the Unites States. Thus, Wilson began a public speaking tour of the country in order to convince the American people of his plan.  He suffered a collapse in Pueblo, Colorado and was forced to return to Washington D.C. after only completing part of his speaking tour. Shortly after returning to the White House, he had a stroke that debilitated him for the remainder of his life. Continue reading